Categories
Activism Personal

HS2 Hates Community Culture

I was arrested in the Euston Square Gardens protest, for defending a park my band rehearsed in. As an anthropology student, I’m worried about HS2 threatening communities and culture as well as nature.Continue readingHS2 Hates Community Culture

Categories
Anthropology Personal

Creating and Maintaining Community in UK Medieval Reenactment

Why do medieval reenactors feel like they’ve “found their people”?Continue readingCreating and Maintaining Community in UK Medieval Reenactment

Categories
Anthropology History

Roland the Farter: Humour Never Changes

Professional farters have existed for a long time. In the 12th century, a man named Roland the Farter paid for his land by performing a jump, a whistle, and a fart for the king on Christmas Day. Why was a fart enough to pay rent, and what’s so funny about farting anyway?Continue readingRoland the Farter: Humour Never Changes

Categories
Anthropology Folklore History

The Norse Cat Who Eats Poor People at Christmas

Did everyone get socks this Christmas? If not, you may be overdue for a visit from the Yule Cat. The Icelandic Yule Cat brings an element of terror to the festive season by eating people who didn’t receive a present of new clothes and teaching us the folklore of wild cats and powerful women.Continue readingThe Norse Cat Who Eats Poor People at Christmas

Categories
Folklore History

The Tears of Saint Lawrence

In August, the Earth passes through the debris left behind by the comet Swift-Tuttle, causing the Perseid meteor shower. When the pebble-sized debris burn up in our atmosphere, we see shooting stars. Christian folklore calls these meteors the tears of St Lawrence, a martyr.Continue readingThe Tears of Saint Lawrence

Categories
History

Xin Zhui: The Marquise Beneath the Mound

A two thousand year old Chinese noblewoman’s elaborate afterlife preparations give us a fascinating glimpse into a world long gone. Her body is the best preserved mummy ever found.Continue readingXin Zhui: The Marquise Beneath the Mound

Categories
Folklore History

May Morning in Oxford

Over a hundred years ago, Alden’s Oxford Guide described “a curious ceremony annually observed at Magdalen College”. On the 1st of May, the choir ascends Magdalen Tower to sing the Hymnus Eucharisticus as the sun rises. Beneath the tower, people gather to to celebrate the arrival of spring.Continue readingMay Morning in Oxford

Categories
Personal

One Year on Testosterone

I am transmasculine. I came out as trans in September 2015, and began hormone replacement therapy in March 2016, a year ago today. In that time, I’ve gone from barely functional to reasonably successful.Continue readingOne Year on Testosterone

Categories
Folklore

Christmas Crappers and the New Year Nose Man

The festive season in Catalonia, an area in Northeastern Spain, is characterised by several colourful characters. Two have became quite well-known because of their scatological humour, the Caganer and the Caga Tió, but there’s a third who I think is just as interesting.Continue readingChristmas Crappers and the New Year Nose Man